A separate set of accounts, in a different book, show:-

'The Accounts of Mr Nathanell King and Mr George Sharkey, churchwardens for the year 1713'. It is interesting to see what was spent.

Paid Coleman's man for a polecat
[This was still wild country, with polecats about].
 
1 shilling
Paid 12 poor sailors upon their travels.
[Presumably they had been discharged after the wars and were making their way home].
 
2 shilling
Paid for a proclamation and prayer book
Bread and wine for Whitsuntide
Mending of bell wheel
Bread and wine
Another polecat
Bread and wine for Michaelmas
Paid for 45 dozen of bread
cheese
a 'barrill' of ale
Bread and wine for Christmas
Another polecat
Bread and wine for Easter
Polecat
Paid for putting up the bell for work
and stuff
Paid for brooms, washing the church
linen and dressing the church at
Christmas and Easter
Paid for three funerals






£2
£1
£1


£10



£7


2s
5s
6d
5s
1s
5s
5s
14s
2s
5s
1s
4s
1s
10s

9s


4s
0d
0d
6d
1d
0d
1d
0d
9d
6d
2d
0d
0d
0d
0d

0d


6d

The 1714 accounts are missing (folio 81).

The 1715 accounts (folio 82) show that they are still paying for polecats (four in the year). They paid 5s 6d for a new bell rope and £ 1 - 05 - Od for a new bell wheel and hanging the bell, but there is no mention of the Almshouse, or building materials.

Various pieces of land had been given for the benefit of the Poor by different people, often in their wills. The records and details of these different charities are hard to disentangle, partly because pieces of land have been absorbed into other hands. The Bishop 'established his right' to one piece. 'A benefaction of five pounds per annum, given by Mrs Margaret Robinson, for the purpose of apprenticing poor children, had been lost'. Small gifts of land had been incorporated in other estates and, when W. Robbins was trying to unravel the history in 1853, he found people curiously unwilling to speak. We have no hope of clarifying the position now. However, one story is worth retelling. It concerns the 'Bread and Cheese Lands'. The London Magazine for December 1737 wrote:-

'Sunday, 18th, this day, according to annual custom, bread and cheese were thrown from Paddington Steeple to the populace, agreeably to the will of two women who were relieved there with bread and cheese when they were almost starved, and Providence after wards favouring them, they left an estate in the parish to continue the custom for ever on that day.

This custom was continued down to about 1838; a single slice of cheese and a penny loaf at last, all that was thrown; the old method of dispensing alms having been found to be anything but charitable alms-giving. The Sunday before Christmas was, in fact, in the last century and beginning of this, a sort of fair-day, for the sturdy vagabonds of London, who came to Paddington to scramble over dead men's bones for bread and cheese.'

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