Index

Arches, 23
Bermondsey Abbey, 37
Bibliography, 20-5
Building materials, 2-3
Carrara Marble, 17-8
Cast Iron, 28-9, 38
Concrete, 32
Crinkle crankle walls, 21-22
Cullum & Nightingale, 1
Erosion, 37
Ferro-concrete, 32-3,38
Fire of London, 27
Fire of London Building Regulations, 34
Future developments, 36-9
Geometry of the round hole, 7
Geometry of arches. 23
Granite, 4-6
Hypocaust, 36-8
Igneous rocks, 2-4
Ketton Stone, 16, 38
Limestone. 8-12
Limestone fossils, 10-13

Mansfield Stone, 37
Marbles, 18
Metamorphic rocks, 2,17-19
Mortars. 20
Moulded brick, 22
Open Air Theatre, 39
Portland Stone, 6
Reigate Stone, 15-16
Roman wall, 37-8
Roman floor tile, 37
RTZ, 1
Sandstone, 16, 37
Sedimentary rocks, 2
Slates, 19
St John's Priory, 14-16
Stucco, 26-7
Thatch,35, 38
Timber houses, 35, 38
Tiling, 36, 38
Tudor tiles, 22
Wrought iron, 30-1
York stone, 16, 38

Opportunities to go further with Geology


Courses in Geology are run by the Extra-Mural Department of the University of London (Russell Square) and at the Natural History Museum at South Kensington.

Of the societies which look to helping the amateur and beginner in Geology, the largest is the Geologists Association, founded in 1858 to do just that. They hold monthly meetings in London: they run field excursions, and publish guides to the better-known areas of British Geology. They also have a Library housed at University College London, in Gower Street. Membership is open to anyone with an interest in Geology without any requirement of qualifications. Details of membership and programme of events can be obtained from the Association Office, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0DU. Tel 020 7434 9298.
 
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